Here we see the open pedestrian concourse, or lanai, which bisected the 1.5 million dollar complex. A "Big M" pylon extends skyward. It was a landmark visible from the nearby Kamehameha, Nimitz and Interstate H1 Highways.
Photo from Library of Congress / David Franzen


A vista view of the mini mall's west facade. The store space on the left was originally leased as a Sav-Mor Drugs. At the time of these photos (August 2004), the 50-year-old MOANALUA CENTER still retained an incredible amount of structural integrity, as no major renovations had ever been performed. It was, indeed, a diamond in the rough.
Photo from Library of Congress / David Franzen


An interior view of a court area on the west side of the complex. Builders used lava rock throughout the facility as an exterior finish. This material, indigenous to Hawai'i, was a standard feature of Ultra-Modern Hawai'ian architecture of the 1950s. MOANALUA CENTER was a definitive example of this style.
Photo from Library of Congress / David Franzen


Another view of the west side court. The mall was derided as "sagging" and "tired" in newspaper articles written by reporters who were, obviously, clueless about classic modern architecture. With such negative commentary being the order of the day, it didn't take much time for the historic structure be demolished.
Photo from Library of Congress / David Franzen


Here we see the northeast corner of MOANALUA CENTER. The mall had a destiny date with a wrecking ball in July 2005.
Photo from Library of Congress / David Franzen


A detail view of the east facade, looking into the pedestrian concourse. The store space on the left, occupied by a combination A & W Root Beer & Long John Silver's, originally housed a Ben Franklin 5 & 10.
Photo from Library of Congress / David Franzen